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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
kerry is firing back at senator rick santorum. it's all about this. opposition to a u.n. treaty. one that a lot of people thought was a no-brainer. it was about the rights of the disabled all over the world. we brought you this story yesterday. senate republicans rejecting this treaty on tuesday despite the fact that one of their own, bob dole, bob dole, a former majority leader, came to the floor in a wheelchair trying to draw support for this treaty. he was being pushed by his wife and made an impassioned plea. senator santorum explained opposition to this treaty in a piece published in "the daily beast." in part he says this. our nation has been been the worldwide leader when it comes to protecting the disabled. we should be telling the u.n. and not the other way around how to ensure dignity and respect for the disabled. effectively saying nobody tells the united states what to do. it sets a very dangerous precedent perhaps for other things. okay. that sounded legitimate until it came out that that's not what the treaty suggests. senator kerry was mincing absolutely no words in sa
sign they are not interested in mending their obstructionist ways. the senate was set to ratify the u.n. convention on the rights of persons with disabilities which has already been ratified about 126 countries worldwide and seeks to protect 700 million people with disabilities from discrimination. the convention was based on the landmark americans with disabilities act, which came to pass with the help of republican senator bob dole. the former senate majority leader was on hand to compel his fellow republicans to ratify the u.n. treaty. even an 89-year-old former colleague confined to a wheelchair couldn't unblock this party's entrance see yens. 66 votes were required to ratify the treaty. 38 u.s. senators, all republicans, found reasons to vote against it. they voted against a treaty that said people with disabilities need to be afforded the same right as other people. 38 senators voted no. yet these are the people we're expecting to do what is best for the country and find a compromise to avert the fiscal cliff. how's that going be working for us? next. [ male announcer ] when it co
critical of rice following the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> when they go after the u.n. ambassador, apparently because they think she's an easy target, then they got a problem with me. >> senator mccain. >> thank you very much, mr. secreta secretary. >> reporter:. i. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and would be easily confirmed by his colleagues. >> reporter: it is a list that includes michelle flournoy who held the number three job at the pentagon. ashton carter is on the list, and former nebraska senator chuck hagel, a republican, could represent a reach across the aisle. >> we're in a much stronger position today as a country than we were in '07. >> reporter: treasury secretary tim geithner said he will stay at his post until at least inauguration. president obama's chief of staff jack lew is often named as a possible replacement. a poll asked if president obama would pick good cabinet members. 58% said they thought he would. 42% said he would not. emily schmidt, cnn, washington. >> you can read more about the president's potential choices for
. why the senate would vote down a u.n. treaty to support universal rights for the disabled. but they did, 38 senators voted no. some of the so-called facts about the treaty are simply fabrications. ahead on the program, pretty spirited discussion. i interview one of the senators who voted no. senator mike lee. i confront him about those facts. also former u.s. attorney general dick thornburg, a republican, who has a disabled child and still holds out hope the treaty will pass. >>> plus, a legal battle to tell you about over 21-month-old child named talia. her mother gave her up for adoption without the father's knowledge or permission while he was away from home serving in the military. now he wants talia back. the child's fate hinges on a judge's decision. we'll tell you how the why you ruled and speak with talia's dad. those stories and landmark cases making it to the supreme court. it will decide the issue of same sex marriage. all that ahead along with the "ridiculist." >> "360" coming up in ten minutes. >>> our fifth story "outfront" tragedy in london. a nurse at the h
with the russian foreign minister and the u.n. mediator in syria today in brevlin. >> let's talk about those meetings. >> you can be sure that this issue of chemical weapons will be at the top of the list. >> no question about that. what are the options there? what can the international community do at this point if, in fact, they are already in a position where they're loading these components on to the weapons? >> well, one is this public message from the united states, from the nato secretary general and from the russians. the syrian government, including assad personally, will be held accountable. second is perhaps to see if the russians can use their influence. they're the big egest arms supplier to syria, the biggest ally that syria has, to dissuade the syrians from letting this chemical weapons loose or using them against the rebel alliance. if assad should fall and there's a chaotic period of time where no one is in charge of the government in damascus, if one of those radical rebel groups gets control of chemical weapons, that could be potentially very, very dangerous and that might
for syria back on track, a u.n. effort that's stalled for so many months now. there's not a lot of hope it will get back on track anytime soon. a lot of international powers and pressure being put on syria to try to comply with some sort of peace plan so this nightmare scenario doesn't come to any sort of fruition. zoraida? >> all right, we're talking about a deadly nerve gas, it is sarin. can you tell us what kind of damage could this do to the people there? >> reporter: it's well known that sarin and the use of sarin is a nightmare scenario. the use of it could kill a huge amount of people in a very short amount of time. now, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you could take out, let's say a city like homs, you could take out a third of the city in the first couple of hours. anderson, this is a highly toxic liquid. it's a persistent agent. it's absolutely completely deadly. >> reporte
voted because they, quote, hate the u.n. >>> tragic ending to a month's long search for two missing cousins. coming up next, the news here today on these iowa girls last seen in july when they left for a bike ride. [ man ] in hong kong, on my way to the board meeting... anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and before i reached the top, the board meeting became a congrats we sold the company party. wait til my wife's phone hears about this. [ cellphone vibrating ] [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center, working together has never worked so well. >>> the families of two missing iowa girls preparing for the worst right now. hunters found two bodies in a wooded area just yesterday afternoon. near the area where 10-year-old lyric cook and 8-year-old cousin elizabeth collins last seen in july. >> i can tell you that we do have two bodies that had been found. right now, it's looking that the outcome
in benghazi. take a listen. >> susan rice has done a great job as our u.n. ambassador. she has been a stalwart colleague in a lot of the tough decisions that we've had to make. and certainly with respect to defending our national interests and national security at the united nations. >> so clinton is also going to testify on benghazi next week. what are the politics of all of this for secretary clinton? and are there risks for her here? >> i don't think there are necessarily risks for her here as long as she stays out of the whole fray of susan rice and congressional republicans. there's an awful lot going on on that score, but i tnk hillary clinton may be able to keep herself above all that. by the way, we keep expecting the white house for this rice situation to be resolved. we fully expect president clinton to make -- excuse me, president obama to make his announcement about his national security team any day now. >> what do you hear with regards to that, david? are you hearing that susan race is going -- susan rice is going to get the nod or that the waters are shark infested and -- >> com
as the u.n. envoy to syria. with so much concern about the threat of chemical weapons at this point, do you think there are any diplomatic options left? >> i think the play -- and hillary clinton met twice today with russian foreign minister lavrov -- is to get russia in the tent with the rest of the world. everyone has predicted, when facts on the ground change, russia will be there. this could be a reset moment for vladimir putin, and he could, because of his unique sway in the area, persuade, i would think, the bashar family to step aside and create a peaceful transition, like the transition in yemen. the opposition is now more broadly representative, and i would hope the russians would see that being on the wrong side of this just creates more carnage, more opportunity for terrorists to get traction there and won't help russia. >> it's a pivotal moment, as we say, a clear tipping point. glad you're back safe and sound from egyp. jane harman, thanks so much for coming in. the jersey shore about to meet the fiscal cliff. grim news for governor christie as he visits washington. >>> plus th
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)